• Alumni
  • Contact
  • Alumni
  • Contact

Kid-Friendly Science Experiments To Learn And Enjoy

Kids friendly science experiments

Bring your young adventurers along on an interesting scientific tour so they may explore, become curious, and learn by doing. These fascinating activities give scientific ideas life, turning learning into a fun and interesting journey for kids. Come explore a world where children’s easy science experiments act as enchanted doorways leading to an endless supply of curiosity and the sheer delight of learning. Below is the list of kid’s friendly science experiments.

Also Read: Science Experiments for Primary Student

  1. Rainbow Milk Explosions:
    • Ingredients:
    • A plate
      Whole milk
      Food colouring
      Dish soap

    • Instructions:
    • Pour a thin layer of milk on the plate.
      To the milk, add a few drops of various food colourings.
      Apply a little dish soap-soaked cotton swab to the surface of the milk.

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • The soap disrupts the fat molecules in the milk, creating a mesmerising explosion of colours. It’s an engaging and dynamic approach to learning about surface tension science making this one of the easy science experiments.

  2. Baking Soda and Vinegar Volcano:
    • Ingredients:
    • Baking soda
      Vinegar
      Dish soap
      A plastic bottle
      Red food colouring

    • Instructions:
    • Set the bottle of plastic on a tray.
      Pour vinegar halfway into the bottle, then mix with a few drops of dish soap and red food colouring.
      Fill the bottle with baking soda, then observe the eruption!

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • A very similar volcanic eruption-like reaction happens when vinegar and baking soda chemically combine and react, leading to the release of carbon dioxide gas making this an interesting science experiment.

  3. Dancing Raisins:
    • Ingredients:
    • A clear glass
      Clear soda (club soda or lemon-lime soda)
      Raisins

    • Instructions:
    • Fill the glass with clear soda.
      Drop a few raisins into the soda and observe them dance!

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • Reduced to a frenetic dance, the raisins rise to the top and then descend again as a result of the carbon dioxide bubbles in the soda attached to their wrinkled surface.

  4. Invisible Ink Messages:
    • Ingredients:
    • Lemon
      Q-tip
      White paper
      Lamp or heat source

    • Instructions:
    • Extract the lime juice in a bowl/container.
      Dip a match stick/Q-tip or something that you may use to write on a paper and write your message.
      Use a lamp or another heat source to gently warm the paper.

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • The secret message is revealed when the heat causes the lemon juice to oxidise and turn brown. Investigating the chemistry of oxidation processes can be entertaining and one of the easy science experiments.

    Also Read: Kindergarten Science Activities & Experiments

  5. Static Electricity Butterfly:
    • Ingredients:
    • A balloon
      Small pieces of paper (cut into butterfly shapes)
      A smooth surface (e.g., a table)

    • Instructions:
    • Tie the blown balloon firmly.
      Press/ Rub the balloon up against your hair or clothes.
      Watch the paper butterfly shapes adhere when you hold the balloon close to them!

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • Rubbing the balloon on your clothes or hair which in turn attracts the lightweight paper butterflies and small pieces of paper, demonstrates the principles of static electricity with an interesting science experiment.

  6. Magic Milk Art:
    • Ingredients:
    • A plate
      Whole milk
      Liquid food colouring
      Dish soap
      Cotton swabs

    • Instructions:
    • Transfer a small amount of milk onto the dish.
      Add drops of different food colouring.
      Dip the cotton swab in dish soap and touch the milk’s surface.

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • Similar to the Rainbow Milk Explosions, the addition of dish soap creates enchanting patterns as it interacts with the fat molecules in the milk.

  7. Homemade Lava Lamp:
    • Ingredients:
    • A clear container with a lid
      Vegetable oil
      Water
      Food colouring
      Tabs of Alka-Seltzer

    • Instructions:
    • To start with, fill the container with 0.25 cup of water and 0.75 cup of oil.
      Add a couple of drops of food colouring.
      Tear up one Alka-Seltzer tablet and mix it into the mixture.

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • The tab reacts with water, creating bubbles that rise through the oil, resembling the movement of a lava lamp.

    Also Read: Teaching Kids Through Science Experiments

  8. Balloon-Powered Car:
    • Ingredients:
    • A balloon
      A plastic bottle
      Straws
      Cardboard
      Wheels (can use CDs, bottle caps, etc.)
      Glue and tape

    • Instructions:
    • Affix the balloon to the plastic bottle’s opening.
      Make a cardboard vehicle body, then add wheels.
      Blow up the balloon, secure it, and let it go to power the car.

    • Experiment Outcome:
    • As the car accelerates due to the escaping air, this interesting science experiment demonstrates Newton’s third law of motion and exposes children to the fundamentals of physics.

  9. Colour-Changing Flowers:
    • Ingredients:
    • White flowers (such as carnations)
      Food colouring
      Water
      Small vases or cups

    • Instructions:
    • Fill the vases with water.
      Add different colours of food colouring to each vase.
      Trim the flower stems and place them in the coloured water.

    • Experiment Outcomes:
    • Children may see how capillary action works as they watch flowers create bright, multicoloured petals by drawing coloured water up their stems.

  10. Water Refraction Magic
    • Ingredients:
    • Clear glass
      Water
      Pencil or straw

    • Instructions:
    • Fill the clear glass with water.
      Place the pencil or straw in the glass and observe its appearance.
      Notice how the pencil or straw seems bent when viewed through the side of the glass.

    • Experiment Outcomes:
    • This interesting science experiment illustrates the refraction phenomenon, which is the change in the direction of light as it passes through various materials. Water transforms this scene by bending light and changing how submerged items are seen visually. This interactive demonstrates how objects seem differently in water due to light refraction.

EuroSchool takes pride in fostering an atmosphere whereby scientific curiosity is fostered via realistic, approachable activities. We combine learning and pleasure because we recognise that every child is different and our approach to education reflects this. With a streamlined EuroSchool admission process, we offer holistic development. Explore campuses across various cities to ensure your child’s future thrives in a nurturing and innovative environment. Here’s a list of our EuroSchool campuses

Schools in Mumbai

Schools in Pune

Schools in Bangalore

Schools in Hyderabad



Admission Enquiry